Saturday, 18 November 2017

Scorpio in the Court Cards

Last in our exploration of Scorpio on the tarot - but not least - Scorpio in the court cards. But which one – or ones?  Different traditions have different astrological correspondences when it comes to the Court Cards.  For instance, the Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn chose to assign cardinal attributes (initiating things) to the Queens, fixed (maintaining order) to the Kings, and mutable (being able to adapt and transform) to the Knights.  Each court card is also linked to the elements, with Pages with Earth, Knights being associated with Fire, Queens with Water, and Kings with Air. 

Prince of Cups (trimmed):
© Thoth Tarot
Following this system, we end up with Fixed Water sign Scorpio being associated with the King of Cups (Air of Water).  The Thoth deck follows this convention, of course, being rooted in the Golden Dawn tradition - although Crowley chose to use Princes rather than Kings, just to add to the confusion! Scorpio – fixed Water: we’re talking about the mastery of emotions and strong passions.
  
I love this image because it really illustrates the idea of Scorpio having to plunge into the depths of the emotional realm in order to get to the bottom of things.  The eagle, another incarnation of Scorpio, pulls the seashell chariot, its wheels bearing the image of a scorpion. It carries the Prince over the surface of the water, ready to dive – but notice it hasn’t yet broken through that barrier, although the serpent (another Scorpio creature) emerging from the cup is looking down towards the water.  This reminds us that we need to recognize our desires, our fears, our cravings – whatever it is that’s driving us; only when we’re truly aware of them should we attempt to master them, otherwise we run the risk of drowning.  The waters appear tranquil, even stagnant perhaps - not yet disturbed by the powerful Prince on his chariot. Calm on the outside, yet powerful within.

Queen of Cups (trimmed):
© Druid Craft Tarot
If you work with a system that assigns Fixed-ness to the Queens, you’re looking at the Queen of Cups.  In the image from the Druid Craft Tarot, we see the Queen with one foot in the water, her throne behind her, a distance away. A serpent, symbol of transformation (and Scorpio) crawls out from behind it.  As the carrier of Scorpio's Fixed Water qualities, the Queen of Cups can be seen as being in control over her emotions and very self-contained – strong Scorpio qualities! She also trusts her instincts and is very intuitive and in touch with the watery world of emotions. Feelings cannot be ignored – or only at your peril.  Other Scorpio traits which could be seen in the Queen are seductiveness and mysteriousness! 



If you’ve enjoyed this post, you might be interested in my e-book, Astrology in Tarot, now available from Amazon.

DruidCraft Tarot created by Philip Carr-Gomm and Stephanie Carr-Gomm, illustrated by Will Worthington, published by Connections
Thoth Tarot created by Aleister Crowley, illustrated by Lady Frieda Harris, published by U.S. Games Systems, Inc.


Monday, 13 November 2017

Scorpio in the Minor Arcana: The Seven of Cups

The Seven of Cups, in the astrological correspondence system I follow, is linked to the last decan (12th-21st November), as well as Venus in Scorpio.   

So, what qualities does Venus bring to Scorpio? Venus has been called ‘the principle of attraction’. It describes our appreciation for beauty (a very subjective area!) and reflects our taste in all sorts of things (dress, art, music, etc) as well as giving us clues about the relationships we’re drawn to.  So, if we combine this with what we know about Scorpio – the Fixed Water sign – what do we find? A deep, emotional attraction – intense, compulsive, obsessive even! There could be a need to ‘dive into the depths’ of relationship in order to feel close to the other.

Seven of Cups (trimmed):
© Shadowscapes Tarot
But there’s also a balance between giving and receiving (remember that Venus also rules airy Libra, which has an affinity to the 7th house of partnership), so Venus in Scorpio can be very healing through transformation in the area of shared resources.

Bu how does this fit with the Seven of Cups? This card is often linked to daydreams and fantasies, and having to make choices from a number of options in order to turn dreams into reality.  In the Shadowscapes Tarot, the image conjures up the phrase ‘castles in the air’. One figure looks up, seeing only dreams and fantasies. The other figure is more grounded, looking at a specific plan.  There are unlimited possibilities, but we need to find a Venusian balance in order to make the changes required.

Seven of Cups (trimmed):
© Sharman-Burke/Caselli Tarot
We see this too in the Sharman-Burke/Caselli image, the cups contains symbols of things that we might long for – the dragon representing strength, the dove - spirit, jewels - wealth (both emotional and material), the laurel - success, the serpent - sexuality, the castle - security, and the draped figure representing our true self.  All things that we might be attracted to – the power of Venus at work! And it may be that we are unwilling to recognize or admit to having all these desires, especially if we feel that we ‘shouldn’t’ have them – that they are ‘taboo’ in some way.

Seven of Cups (trimmed):
© Druid Craft Tarot
The Druid Craft's version evokes that sense of longing too, but there's a sadness in this image, I feel, leading to an emotional imbalance.  But is he so lost in the choices in the pool that he's unaware of what's going on elsewhere? A bit like the two figures in the Shadowscapes image, perhaps, needing to make a change, a choice, to regain emotional harmony.

Seven of Vessels (trimmed):
© Wildwood Tarot
The Wildwood echoes that sense of sadness - the creators of the deck chose 'mourning' as the keyword for the card. The Scorpio theme comes through here loud and strong, as they write in the accompanying book "a time to honour what is dead and mourn for what is gone. ..offering thanks for cherished memories and being at peace with the past".  Although this is not a deck rooted in astrology, I can see the idea of being at peace with what's gone before, and cherishing memories being quite Venusian and Scorpionic.  We need to let emotions go through their natural cycle (Scorpio associated with cycles of death and rebirth) in order to achieve that peace (Venus being the ruler of Libra, the sign of peace, balance and harmony).

Seven of Cups (trimmed):
© Thoth Tarot
In the Thoth Tarot, the word that Crowley chose for the card is ‘debauchery’.  As with many of the cards in this deck, I feel it’s coming from the other direction – but yet still brings us to the same point.  The daydreams or fantasies may have led to overindulgence, satiation, succumbing to our compulsions – particularly things which we feel are ‘taboo’ or not allowed – ending up with us feeling emotionally out of balance. Venus is no longer in her beloved Libra, but is now in deep, dark intense Scorpio!  But the message is the same – it’s time to open our eyes and see the reality, not the dreams – otherwise we can’t move forward; we will stagnate.   We may still choose one of those dreams, but it’s time to turn it into reality.



If you’ve enjoyed this post, you might be interested in my e-book, Astrology in Tarot, now available from Amazon.

Beginner’s Guide to the Tarot created by Juliet Sharman-Burke, illustrated by Giovanni Caselli, published by Connections
Druid Craft Tarot created by Philip Carr-Gomm and Stephanie Carr-Gomm, illustrated by Will Worthington, published by Connections
Shadowscapes Tarot created by Stephanie Pui-Mun Law and Barbara Moore, published by Llewellyn
Thoth Tarot created by Aleister Crowley, illustrated by Lady Frieda Harris, published by U.S. Games Systems, Inc.
Wildwood Tarot created by Mark Ryan and John Matthews, illustrated by Will Worthington, published by Connections



Thursday, 9 November 2017

Scorpio in the Minor Arcana: The Six of Cups

Back to the Minor Arcana! Today we move on to the Six of Cups, which - in the system I use - is linked to the second decan (2nd- 11th November) as well as the Sun in Scorpio.

Just to recap: Scorpio is the fixed Water sign, so Scorpio will want to know what’s going on at a deeper level, not at the bubbly surface – “still waters run deep” is a good description of Scorpio’s focus.  Scorpio has to dive into the depths in order to unearth the root of a problem and will then try to transform it – but it may take a crisis or something similar before Scorpio will take that plunge. 

Six of Cups (trimmed):
© Sharman-Burke/Caselli Tarot
But here we have Sun in Scorpio – the addition of warmth and light!  Sounds like the complete opposite of dark and intense Scorpio, you might think?  If we think in terms of the Sun representing our creative energy, then in Scorpio that creativity is going draw on our emotions and intuition at a very deep level.  This could be seen as the need to express our creativity by changing or transforming something.  The Sun also represents our core being, our vitality – and in Scorpio this could connect us to our inner desires, perhaps even compulsions or obsessions.  The ‘shadow’ side of this – the reversal, if you like – could be seen as emotional obsessions or fixations getting in the way of the expression of creative energy, or perhaps the fear of losing control.

How is the Sun in Scorpio reflected in the Six of Cups?  If we think of themes of ‘past memories and future dreams’ (Juliet Sharman Burke’s keywords), we can see how nostalgia becomes a place of refuge when what’s going on in the present is too difficult to face.  The harmony (Six) and the gentleness (Cups) feel warm – like the Sun’s energy, allowing us to penetrate what’s going on at the surface and to go deeper into the root of the issue.  Juliet Sharman-Burke also talks about the idea of old love reappearing or being rekindled – again, the idea of cycles, of relationships that have died coming back to life.

Six of Cups (trimmed):
© Shadowscapes Tarot
The Shadowscapes Tarot's Six of Cups conjures up lots of childhood memories for me - tea parties with teddy bears and other stuffed animals!  It reminds me that I need to be more open-minded, to look at things from a more child-like perspective - with innocence and wonder - rather than always from the jaded grown-up viewpoint.  I'm also reminded of the idea of the puer aeternus (‘eternal boy’) and its shadow, the senex (‘old man’), and the need to recognize both aspects in ourselves, rather than let one overshadow the other.

Six of Cups (trimmed):
© Thoth Tarot
The downside, or ‘shadow’, of the Sun in Scorpio/Six of Cups is the potential trap of living in the past. That takes us back to the images of the Five of Cups – focusing on what’s past and ignoring what we still have.  Following that theme, remember the lotus roots in the Thoth Tarot’s Five of Cups, and how they formed a butterfly-shape? Well, in the Thoth’s Six of Cups, we see that lotus in its opened, receptive form – it’s been transformed; the fear of disappointment has been overcome so that more pleasant things can be enjoyed.  Enjoy what we have now, and let go of what’s past – that, to me, is the essence of the Sun in Scorpio!


If you’ve enjoyed this post, you might be interested in my e-book, Astrology in Tarot, now available from Amazon.

Beginner’s Guide to the Tarot created by Juliet Sharman-Burke, illustrated by Giovanni Caselli, published by Connections
Shadowscapes Tarot created by Stephanie Pui-Mun Law and Barbara Moore, published by Llewellyn
Thoth Tarot created by Aleister Crowley, illustrated by Lady Frieda Harris, published by U.S. Games Systems, Inc.



Sunday, 5 November 2017

Scorpio in the Major Arcana: Death

After dipping into the Minor Arcana – and the excitement of the Samhuinn Tarot Blog Hop! - let’s look at Scorpio in the Major Arcana.  Given what we know of Scorpio, it probably comes as no surprise that the card associated with Scorpio (in the system I follow) is ‘Death’.  Death, as in the end of a cycle – something that’s necessary in order to allow something new to grow and develop.  Not physical death, or at least, not necessarily. 

Traditional depictions of ‘Death’, number 13 in the Rider-Waite-Smith tarot, show us a knight in armour on a white horse, a king dead underfoot, a religious figure in its path, sometimes children.  The image in the Sharman-Burke/Caselli tarot (Beginners' Guide to the Tarot) is a variation on that theme; here the horse is black (the colour associated with death in some cultures), its rider a skeleton.  The skeleton’s headdress is a swaddling cloth, used at birth, reflecting the link between birth and death and the unending cycle of life. 

The skeleton carries an hourglass, reminding us that everything has its time. In the distance, we see a river – another reminder of the ongoing process of transformation, this time in the form of the hydrological cycle (the river water evaporates and forms clouds, the clouds rain, the water falls back to earth).  The boat is said to symbolize both the cradle and the coffin. In the foreground we see a raven, thought to be a harbinger of death in many traditions.  The theme is Scorpionic – transformation and change; endings linked with beginnings.

XIII Death (trimmed):
© Thoth Tarot
The skeleton with his scythe are also seen in the Crowley Thoth tarot’s version of ‘Death’.  He wears two faces here – one is that of the destroyer, the other that of the liberator – reminding us that in order to change, we may have to let go of things that hold us back, that no longer serve us.  The headdress of this skeleton is a funereal head-covering, used in ancient Egypt – a reminder of the need to bury old, out-dated, invalid ideas and beliefs so that new life can begin.  We see the scorpion at the bottom of the image, ready to sting, and the snake – perhaps THE symbol of transformation – ready to bite.  A fish, representing the past, swims through the serpent’s coils: is it the next victim?  Above it all, the phoenix, which can only rise from the ashes once the fire has consumed everything in its way. Intense? Oh yes!

XIII Death (trimmed):
© Shadowscapes Tarot
The Shadowscapes Tarot also draws on the promise of renewal with its phoenix rising from the ashes of the devastation, the tearing down of what has been, ready for what’s to come.  It's one of the more 'optimistic' versions of the Death card, I think - the fiery-red phoenix, symbol of death and rebirth and life all in one, looks upwards and outwards towards what appears to be a sunny future... What do you think?

The creator of the Shadowscapes deck, Stepanie Pui-Mun Law, incorporates a lot of botanical symbolism in her images. Here we see irises, my favourite flower. These are also associated with death, through Greek mythology: Iris, goddess of the rainbow, would not only travel down to earth with messages from the gods, but also transported souls to the underworld.  

13 The Journey (trimmed):
© Wildwood Tarot
Deadly nightshade can also been seen here - an extremely poisonous plant, so associated with deception, danger, and death - as well as sumac, which (according to the Victorian language of flowers) says "I will survive the change". 

The Wildwood draws on different images of death, representing transformation.  In ‘The Journey’, Will Worthington has given us an image of the raven (considered to be a guardian of the dead, or guide to the otherworld) tearing flesh from a skull of a reindeer - a symbol of the stripping of life, and of the (re)cycling of life through death and birth; all 8th house/Scorpio issues.  

Both the Druid Craft’s creators and Margarete Petersen have made reference to the Crone in their depictions of Death. There’s an element of looking backwards and forwards with the Crone-Hermit, and that ‘crone knowledge’ or wisdom associated with the Hermit is necessary in order to make the changes that Death demands. The serpent, representing transformation, is present in both images – in fact, in Margarete Petersen’s version, we see two serpents, one white, one black. There are links back to her High Priestess, Chariot, and even the Lovers in the way she’s used duality and opposites in her work. Her Death image is almost a mirror image: white serpent meets black serpent; Death, in the form of a cloaked skeleton, stands behind the white, earth-bound figure. Out of the dark comes light. A bit like the phoenix, then?
Death (trimmed):
© Margarete Petersen Tarot

XIII Death (trimmed):
© Druid Craft Tarot




If you’ve enjoyed this post, you might be interested in my e-book, Astrology in Tarot, now available from Amazon.

Beginner’s Guide to the Tarot created by Juliet Sharman-Burke, illustrated by Giovanni Caselli, published by Connections
DruidCraft Tarot created by Philip Carr-Gomm and Stephanie Carr-Gomm, illustrated by Will Worthington, published by Connections
Margarete Petersen Tarot, AGM-URANIA/Deep Books, 2004.
Shadowscapes Tarot created by Stephanie Pui-Mun Law and Barbara Moore, published by Llewellyn
Thoth Tarot created by Aleister Crowley, illustrated by Lady Frieda Harris, published by U.S. Games Systems, Inc.
Wildwood Tarot created by Mark Ryan and John Matthews, illustrated by Will Worthington, published by Connections



Tuesday, 31 October 2017

Tarot Blog Hop Samhuinn 2017: Birth, Death & Rebirth


Welcome to Alison’s Alembic!   You may have arrived here as a stop on the Tarot Blog Hop from either Hannah Berg's or Brandi Hopkins' blog. Or you may have found this through TABI’s Facebook page, or though one of the many wonderful tarot bloggers in the ether... It doesn’t matter – what does matter is that you’re here!

It’s the time of Samhuinn (“summer’s end”), a liminal time when the veil that separates us from those who are no longer walking in this world is thinnest. The Day of the Dead, a time to honour the ancestors - and, in the old Celtic tradition, the end of the year.  Our wrangler for this particular Blog Hop, Jay Cassels, has asked us to look at where we are at the end of this cycle – what’s happened to us since last Samhuinn, and where we might be headed as we begin a new year.
This resonates with me more than usual, as I’m approaching the end of an even bigger cycle early next year – my Saturn Return!  Not only that, but this year sees Jupiter travelling through Scorpio, the home of my natal Jupiter, so I’ll be experiencing the end of yet another cycle during the coming year.
With all that in mind, I’ve decided to use the Spirit of the Circle spread (as described in the accompany book to the Druid Animal Oracle) and my ‘go to’ deck for this time of year, the Wildwood.
Card 2                                   Card 7                                   Card 4
Spirit of the Ancestors             The Gift                           Spirit of Time

Card 1
Self
Card 5                                   Card 6                                   Card 3
Spirit of Place                     Spirit of the Journey       Spirit of the Tribe

Self: Queen of Bows - Hare
This suggests that over the past year I’ve become kinder to, and more understanding of, myself – and, I hope, others too. These qualities have certainly helped me to complete several of my long-term projects earlier this year, and I'm sure they will stand me in good stead in whatever I set out to do over the coming year.
Spirit of the Ancestors: 5 The Ancestor 
(I kid you not - I really did draw this card!)
I’m at the gateway of a new cycle, I know. A turning point. I’m wary of what lies ahead but I know that if I listen to my ‘inner ancestor’ and draw from all my past experience – not only from the past year but from all my experiences – I will have the strength and patience (I’m a double Taurus, after all!) to keep me going on whatever new path calls me.
Spirit of the Tribe: Page of Bows - Stoat
Second card from the Bows, and second court card too!  The stoat is a hunter, with the ability to change the colour of its fur. That, and the fact that it lives underground, has given me a strong sense of secrecy (highlighting my Scorpio Ascendant), of staying hidden when necessary and adapting to changing circumstances.  There’s a bit of the “free spirit” at work too, underlying all the “shoulds” and “ought tos” that The Spirit of the Tribe – today’s culture, in other words – projects, which I’d be wise to listen to. Keep my head down until it feels right to pounce! 
Spirit of Time: Ace of Bows
Subtitled “The Spark of Life”, the Ace of Bows (the third Bow to appear in the spread), this suggests that the “spirit of the times” is inviting me to start a new fire burning, to kindle a new spark of creativity, to hunt out new skills to learn.
Spirit of Place:  6 The Forest Lovers
I have been working with the image of the Forest for the past couple of years, as part of my path, so seeing the Forest Lovers representing Spirit of Place  resonates on that level.  I feel I'm nearing the end of this part of the path, so this card reminds me that I'll have choices to make when I reach the next "fork" in my journey.
Spirit of the Journey: Ten of Arrows
Subtitled “Instruction”, this card conjures up the completion of two long-held writing projects over the past year.  The passing on or sharing of knowledge and ideas…that’s the journey I’ve been on this year – perhaps there’s more to come as the wheel continues to turn...
The Gift: King of Bows – Adder
A bit of a shudder when I drew this card (snake phobia) but I also felt a shiver of excitement at this gift. Maturity, strength of resolve, energy and wisdom are phrases associated with this card – what wonderful qualities to receive as the new year begins.
Thank you for stopping off here on your travels through this Samhain Tarot Blog Hop!  Please do come back and read some of my other posts.

The next stops on the Tarot Blog Hop are - depending on whether you’re moving backwards or forwards through the list - Hannah Berg's or Brandi Hopkins’ blog. The Master List can be found here.

Friday, 27 October 2017

Scorpio in the Minor Arcana: The Five of Cups

Let’s start our exploration of Scorpio in the tarot in the Minor Arcana.  In the astrological correspondence system that I follow, Scorpio is linked to the Five, Six and Seven of Cups. Today I’m going to look at the Five of Cups, which corresponds to the first ten days of Scorpio (this year, the 23rd October to around the 1st November) – and to Mars in Scorpio.

Scorpio is the fixed Water sign, so we’re looking at maintaining our emotional resources, delving into the depths to get at the heart or root of what’s going on.

Mars, the traditional ruler of Scorpio, is associated with the element of Fire.  Mars is the warrior, the Roman god of war – powerful, passionate, driven by strong desires, and very likely to take the initiative.  Mars is decisive, and needs to express himself freely – which could come into conflict with the Scorpio preference for keeping things hidden, buried away in the depths.  Mars likes to be in control but when combined with Scorpio’s energy, this is likely to manifest through an intense transformation of emotional power at a very deep level.

Five of Cups (trimmed):
© Sharman-Burke/Caselli Tarot
So how might this play out in the Five of Cups?  Let‘s start by looking at a relatively ‘traditional’ depiction of the Five of Cups, from the Sharman-Burke/Caselli deck (Beginners Guide to Tarot). Here we see a figure facing away from us, looking down at the three overturned cups in front of him. He’s so intent on these and what’s spilling out of them, that he doesn’t see the two that still stand, intact.  Juliet Sharman-Burke uses the words ‘regret’ and ‘sorrow’ for this card. So we have someone who feels deep sorrow at what’s happened (the three cups emptying), but who’s ignoring or overlooking at what still exists (the two full cups).  The decisiveness and freedom of expression that Mars would usually exert is being held back by the compulsion to look only at the loss and the emotions that accompany it – to become lost in the emotion itself perhaps?
Five of Cups (trimmed):
© Shadowscapes Tarot

In the Shadowscapes Tarot, we have a slightly different interpretation. The figure is ignoring the three overturned cups at her feed, focusing on the one in her hands. The fifth cup bobs on the waves in front of her – does she see it? Which one holds her hopes – the one she’s gazing into with Martian determination, or the one that’s trying to head out to sea with Martian determination of its own?  Perhaps the cup she holds represents what’s happened, and her feelings of sorrow or disappointment, while the cup on the waves is pushed and pulled by the tide, unable to move forward. Again, the decisiveness and freedom of expression associated with Mars being held back by being lost in the emotion of loss.

Five of Cups (trimmed):
© Thoth Tarot
In the Thoth deck, the emphasis is the same – regret, sorrow, and the disappointment of unfulfilled expectations.  The cups are empty and look as though they could easily break. The lotus has been uprooted, and its blossoms have died. Even the water looks dead.  But the roots of the lotus form a butterfly shape, representing the idea of transformation – the theme of Scorpio.  The card warns against allowing the potentially aggressive, potentially destructive Martian energy to spill over.  That energy can be used usefully though, by transforming it – by shifting the emphasis from what’s lost to what’s still available to us. We can learn from disappointment – nothing is ever wasted. Remember that Scorpio represents cycles, endings and beginnings – and is the ultimate recycler!


Five of Vessels (trimmed):
© Wildwood Tarot
The Wildwood, on the other hand, shows us a rather different view!  Although Mark Ryan and John Matthews, the deck’s creators, haven’t use astrological correspondences I see Will Worthington's figure symbolising the passion of Mars, using that energy to travel to deep levels through dance.  I think here of shamanic work – dancing in trance – and the revelations and transformations that can come through this. Powerful stuff!

Beginner’s Guide to the Tarot created by Juliet Sharman-Burke, illustrated by Giovanni Caselli, published by Connections
Shadowscapes Tarot created by Stephanie Pui-Mun Law and Barbara Moore, published by Llewellyn
Thoth Tarot created by Aleister Crowley, illustrated by Lady Frieda Harris, published by U.S. Games Systems, Inc.
Wildwood Tarot created by Mark Ryan and John Matthews, illustrated by Will Worthington, published by Connections


Monday, 23 October 2017

Scorpio: The Great Composter!

Today, at 06.26 BST, the Sun moved (astrologically) from Libra into Scorpio. 

The leaves continue to change colour, but now they’re falling from branches, covering the earth in a blanket of gold, bronze, and orange.  The autumn winds lift them up; they whirl through the air, twisting and swirling in a vortex... 

Since the equinox, the nights are growing longer, giving us the opportunity to spend more time dreaming.   Here in the mid-latitudes of the northern hemisphere, people are planting bulbs – the ‘seed’ of life being sown underground where it will lie protected and nurtured until it’s ready to ‘spring’ forth in a few months’ time.  Is it any wonder that Scorpio, the scorpion, is the sign of transformation?  All around us, in nature, the world appears to be going to sleep; animals are starting to hibernate, the birds are gathering and forming their migratory v-shapes as they head for warmer climates. 

Before long it will be Samhain (“summer’s end”) the end and start of the Celtic New Year, the Day of the Dead – times of transformation and change, which is what we’ve come to associate with Scorpio.  In astrology, Scorpio is one of the three Water signs, along with Cancer and Pisces, as well as being one of the four Fixed signs.   It ends the second cycle of the elements (Cancer through to Scorpio), and opposes Taurus on the axis of resources.  While Taurus is interested in material resources, Scorpio – as a water sign – is more interested in emotional resources.  As a Fixed sign, Scorpio wants to know what’s going on at a deeper level, not at the bubbly surface – “still waters run deep” is a good description of Scorpio’s focus.  Only by diving into the depths can Scorpio unearth the root of a problem and attempt to transform it – and it will probably take a crisis or something similar before Scorpio will take that plunge. 
‘Scorpio’ ©Alison Coals

The traditional ruler of Scorpio is the planet Mars, providing passion and drive.  It also has a modern ruler, Pluto, named after the Lord of the Underworld, reflecting the cycle of life and death and the change involved.  Both planets are associated with power; “knowledge is power” is another good description.  

We’ve just left Libra, with its 7th-house focus on partnership, and the need for harmony and balance through negotiation and diplomacy. Now we’re about to move into 8th-house issues with Scorpio – shared resources, power issues, life cycles,…and recycling! What follows once the contract is made, within partnerships and relationships (of all kinds)…  Emotions run deep, and power struggles can ensue.  Intensity.  What will be the fall-out, as we move into fall/autumn (northern bias again)? What are we recycling, or composting? Any transformation, under the auspices of Scorpio, will be intense!




The 'Scorpio' image, from my AstroArt series, is a collage, using watercolour on paper.