Tuesday, 17 October 2017

Libra in the Minor Arcana: The Four of Swords

The last of the three minor Swords cards associated with Libra, the Four of Swords is linked to Jupiter in the cardinal Air sign. It also corresponds to the last ten days of Libra, from the 13th through to the 22nd October this year (see Elizabeth Hazel’s excellent Tarot Decoded, published by Weiser, 2004, for more on Planetary and Zodiacal dignities).

So, what qualities does Jupiter bring to Libra? Well, Jupiter is associated with expansion, the broadening of horizons – and by association, optimism and faith.  Jupiter was a Roman god, also known as Jove, giving us the word ‘jovial’ – so we have humour, as well as benevolence to add to the Jupiterian or Jovian mix. But we also have the sense of fairness – Jupiter as the arbiter at the tribunal.

Four of Swords (trimmed):
© DruidCraft Tarot
Add this to the cardinal airy-ness of Libra, the quest for harmony and balance within relationship, and what happens?  The quest expands!  The objectivity and fairness is still there, but now we can add diplomat as well as negotiator – the ability to see the ‘bigger picture’.  Not only fair-minded, but also broad-minded, Jupiter in Libra wants to see things grow and develop through co-operation, and encourages this.  One thing to be wary of might be the need to weigh everything up, which could perhaps inhibit the confidence and decisive thought!

How does this fit with the Four of Swords?  This card is often associated with themes of recuperation, rest, and convalescence. Four is a number of stability – think of a square: it rests solidly on four corners, and it takes a lot to shift it.  Taking time to stand still (or lie still, as often depicted in Four of Swords images) to recover or re-charge before facing the next challenge is definitely indicated.

Four of Feathers (trimmed):
© Margarete Petersen Tarot
Jupiter in Libra brings a sense of clarity, after the pain and sorrow of the Three.  With acceptance – the lesson from the Three – comes time to breathe, to take a deep breath, to expand the lungs, to expand our view of the situation.  To quote Gerd Ziegler (‘Tarot: Mirror of the Soul’, published by Weiser Books), what “has seemed hopeless until now actually carries within itself all the elements for a fortunate, prosperous solution.”  Through rest, the body, mind, spirit and emotions have all been brought together ready to face another day.



If you’ve enjoyed this post, you might be interested in my e-book, Astrology in Tarot, now available from Amazon.


DruidCraft Tarot created by Philip Carr-Gomm and Stephanie Carr-Gomm, illustrated by Will Worthington, published by Connections
Margarete Petersen Tarot, AGM-URANIA/Deep Books, 2004.



Thursday, 12 October 2017

Libra in the court cards

I’m taking a break from the Minor Arcana today. Instead, I’m looking at Libra in the court cards. But which one – or ones?  Different traditions have different astrological correspondences when it comes to the Court Cards. For instance, the Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn chose to assign cardinal attributes (initiating things) to the Queens, fixed (maintaining order) to the Kings, and mutable (being able to adapt and transform) to the Knights.  Each court card is also linked to the elements, with Pages with Earth, Knights being associated with Fire, Queens with Water, and Kings with Air. 

Queen of Swords (trimmed):
© Secret Tarot
Following this system, we end up with Cardinal Air sign Libra being associated with the Queen of Swords (Water of Air). What qualities do we associate with this Queen? Extremely perceptive and observant, quick-witted, confident. She’s often seen as a figure who’s been touched by sorrow, who’s learned to accept and assimilate her experiences with grace and dignity – a fine balancing act, bring that Venusian ruling of Libra into play.  The peacemaker, perhaps?

Queen of Swords (trimmed):
© Shadowscapes Tarot
The Shadowscapes’ Queen of Swords holds two (duality and balance again) curved swords to cut through deception, to see the issue clearly.  The white chrysanthemums symbolize purity, clarity and honesty; the purple lilies inner strength (so says the deck’s creators in the accompanying book; details below).

Queen of Swords (trimmed):
© Thoth Tarot
The Thoth deck follows the Golden Dawn convention. Here we have the Queen, sword in hand, having cut away the mask to reveal the reality – or to see more clearly.  Her sword liberates, allowing us to move out of the clouds and into a clear, open sky.  There’s a sense of the balance of Libra, too, I think, in the way she sits on her throne – a bit like the figures seen in Justice cards in other decks, perhaps?

King of Swords (trimmed):
© Sharman-Burke/Caselli Tarot
If you work with a system that assigns cardinality to the Kings, you’re looking at the King of Swords.  In the image from Juliet Sharman-Burke’s Beginner's Guide to the Tarot, we see the King on his throne, wearing blue (Air) and purple (wisdom). Two birds fly above his head; the number ‘two’ reminds us of the Libran theme of balance and choice, as well as the Air-like quality of the mind being able to rise above things.  The King of Swords is sometimes associated with the legal profession, particularly in terms of truth and social justice.  As in the Adjustment card of the Thoth deck, we’re always having to make adjustments in order to keep things in balance.  This King appears calm and in charge of things – everything’s in balance, in order.  As Libra is an Air sign, that balance and order is likely to be maintained by words, rather than by physical force.  The pen may be mightier than the sword, but here I think the sword represents the pen!   I could certainly see him as a mediator.


If you’ve enjoyed this post, you might be interested in my e-book, Astrology in Tarot, now available from Amazon.

Beginner’s Guide to the Tarot created by Juliet Sharman-Burke, illustrated by Giovanni Caselli, published by Connections
Secret Tarot created by Marco Nizzoli, published by Lo Scarabeo, 2004
Shadowscapes Tarot created by Stephanie Pui-Mun Law and Barbara Moore, published by Llewellyn
Thoth Tarot created by Aleister Crowley, illustrated by Lady Frieda Harris, published by U.S. Games Systems, Inc.


Saturday, 7 October 2017

Libra in the Minor Arcana: The Three of Swords

Today we move on to the Three of Swords, linked to Saturn in Libra.  It also corresponds to the second ten-day period in Libra – this year, that’s from about the 3rd October through to the 12th (see Elizabeth Hazel’s excellent Tarot Decoded, published by Weiser, 2004, for more on Planetary and Zodiacal dignities).

Just to recap: Libra is the cardinal Air sign, so we’re looking at creative energy around activity involving thought, ideas, logic, reason.  It’s about partnerships of all kinds, but the emphasis is on the contractual side of things – wanting to ensure equality and fairness within the relationship, be it personal or professional – rather than the romance and passion.  Libra is ruled by Venus, so often takes on the role of peacemaker or mediator.

But here we have Saturn in Libra!  One of the things that Saturn symbolizes is the imposition of limits and restrictions. Sometimes this works to our advantage – where would we be without some boundaries in place? But sometimes it feels as though it’s working against us.  Through the connection to Kronos (the Greek counterpart to the Roman god Saturn), we have a link to time and chronology as well.

Interestingly, Saturn is what we call ‘exalted’ (not to be confused with rulership) in Libra, meaning that it’s very comfortable in this sign.  Saturn in Libra represents the ability to establish and maintain relationships on an equal footing.  Through the ‘time-management’ quality of Saturn, it also symbolizes the ability to organize and structure relationships based on harmony and balance.  Discipline plays a big part in maintaining these partnerships, in which promises and commitments are honoured.

Three of Arrows (trimmed):
© Wildwood Tarot
A connection to the Three of Swords isn’t obvious, is it?  Traditionally, we’ve come to think of this card as representing a release of tension, and the need to accept that disappointment and pain are an inevitable part of life’s journey.  I like Rachel Pollack’s view on this: that the way to deal with sorrow is to take it into our hearts, accept it, and to go beyond it.  We see that in the traditional images in this card - often shown as a heart being pierced by arrows.  I think too of Venus, Libra's ruler, when I see the heart; she represents harmony, which is what we're after here - the bringing into balance of sorrow and joy, if you like.

To me, the links to Saturn are the time and discipline elements – recognizing that there are times and situations where things have to change, and that sometimes it takes time and self-discipline to accept that, no matter how sad or painful the circumstances.  I’ve heard it said that joy and sorrow come from the same place, which conjures up the images of the scales of Libra; sorrow has to be balanced by joy, through a process of resolution – all very Libran themes.

Three of Swords (trimmed):
© Shadowscapes Tarot
The Shadowscapes Tarot reflects this, I think. The swan is an ancient symbol of wisdom; knowing that hope can emerge from sorrow. We're in the suit associated with air and the mind; we talk about having heads in the clouds...perhaps we can see this as being about (as the accompanying book, details below, says) "...overcome the pain, the weeping of the heart is perhaps a necessary cleansing...lift up white wings to dance with the sky once again".


Three of Swords (trimmed):
© Thoth Tarot
I also like Gerd Ziegler’s (‘Tarot: Mirror of the Soul’, published by Weiser Books) take on this. He talks about Saturn making all our limitations visible – the restrictions that we place on ourselves through fear and doubt place – and the need to bring clarity (the Swords) to this in order to bring things back into balance and harmony (Libra).  The image in the Thoth deck reflects the heaviness comes with worry and sadness. The sword in the centre reminds us of the need for clarity, Saturn making all the restrictions (the two smaller swords) visible to us, showing us how limiting fear and doubt are.

If you’ve enjoyed this post, you might be interested in my new e-book, Astrology in Tarot, now available from Amazon.


Shadowscapes Tarot created by Stephanie Pui-Mun Law and Barbara Moore, published by Llewellyn
Thoth Tarot created by Aleister Crowley, illustrated by Lady Frieda Harris, published by U.S. Games Systems, Inc.
Wildwood Tarot created by Mark Ryan and John Matthews, illustrated by Will Worthington, published by Connections


Monday, 2 October 2017

Libra in the Minor Arcana: The Two of Swords

Now let’s turn to the Minor Arcana.  In the astrological correspondence system that I follow, Libra is linked to the Two, Three and Four of Swords. Today I’m going to look at the Two of Swords, which corresponds to the Moon in Libra. It also corresponds to the first 10 days of Libra – this year, from the 23rd September to 2nd October.

Libra is the cardinal Air sign, so we’re looking at creative energy around activity involving thought, ideas, logic, reason.  Libra, as we’ve already seen in previous posts, is also about partnerships of all kinds, but the emphasis isn’t on the passion but rather on the contractual side of things – wanting to ensure equality and fairness within the relationship, be it personal or professional.  Libra, through its rulership by Venus, is the peacemaker, the lover of harmony and refinement.

The Moon is associated with the element of Water, through its rulership of Cancer, and so we have a link to the watery realm of feelings and emotion.  The Moon in Libra, then, will bring sensitivity to what could otherwise be a quite detached, ‘airy’ approach to relationship.  The Moon in Libra will want to protect and nurture those partnerships, and will quite probably be very aware of their partner’s emotions and how they might react to situations. They may also be very vulnerable to their own emotions!
Two of Swords (trimmed):
© Thoth Tarot

So how might this play out in the Two of Swords? I’m going to start with the Crowley Thoth deck, not least because the Two of Swords in this deck carries the keyword ‘peace’.  The two crossed swords in the image pierce a rose; the symbolism suggests surrendering to love (the rose) rather than war. Remember that slogan ‘Make love, not war’?!  The message is about being able to use intuition and awareness (the Moon) to see things clearly so that a decision can be made.  The windmills in the background represent the ideas – the inspiration (‘in-spire’ – to breath in) – in our imagination that need to be brought forward.

Two of Swords (trimmed):
© Sharman-Burke/Caselli Tarot
A more traditional depiction of the Two of Swords can be seen in the Sharman-Burke/Caselli deck. Here we have a woman, blindfolded, with two swords crossed over her chest, sitting with her back to a stormy sea.  There’s a waxing crescent moon in the sky behind her; that, and the fact that her back is turned to the sea, suggest she’s chosen to ignore her emotions.  She wants to protect herself (the Moon, again) from the challenges and difficult decisions facing her.  The blindfold is part of that protection; the challenges are in front of her but by choosing to cover her eyes, she doesn’t have to face them.  No sign of the ‘peace’ that the Thoth’s Two of Swords shows us (although the crossed swords in that image represent the sense of being at a crossroads).  However, the message is similar – hiding from reality takes a lot of effort, and that effort can’t be maintained indefinitely; those two swords will become too heavy.  By drawing on intuition rather than over-protection (i.e. using the Moon’s energy in a different way), a way forward can be clearly seen.

Two of Swords (trimmed):
© Druid Craft Tarot
The creators of the Druid Craft Tarot follow the tradition of the blindfolded woman and the crossed swords, but here she turns her back to us, facing instead into the forest.  Two paths stretch out ahead of her, both leading into the forest but where they will end up is unclear.  By wearing the blindfold, she avoids having to make the decision as to which way to go.  Again, if she were to choose to use her awareness, rather than choosing to hide (thinking she’s protecting herself), she might be able to ‘see’ which path to choose.


Two of Arrows (trimmed):
© Wildwood Tarot
In the Wildwood Tarot, created by Mark Ryan and John Matthews, and beautifully illustrated by Will Worthington, the Two of Arrows also shows a blindfolded woman with crossed arrows against her chest. We also see the scales of Libra overhead, against the backdrop of a stormy, cloudy sky, but the scales are not balanced.  The reading points for this card talk about injustice and inequality – very Libran themes – and the need to balance the scales through honesty.  We’re asked here to question, to use our mental awareness – the cardinal, airy qualities of Libra as well as the instinct of the Moon – to decide what is just and fair.  In that way, the scales will be balanced, bringing perhaps that sense of ‘peace’ of the Thoth’s Two.

If you’ve enjoyed this post, you might be interested in my new e-book, Astrology in Tarot, now available from Amazon.

Beginner’s Guide to the Tarot created by Juliet Sharman-Burke, illustrated by Giovanni Caselli, published by Connections
DruidCraft Tarot created by Philip Carr-Gomm and Stephanie Carr-Gomm, illustrated by Will Worthington, published by Connections
Thoth Tarot created by Aleister Crowley, illustrated by Lady Frieda Harris, published by US Games Systems, Inc.
Wildwood Tarot created by Mark Ryan and John Matthews, illustrated by Will Worthington, published by Connections.

Wednesday, 27 September 2017

Libra in the Major Arcana: Justice

Libra is one of the three Air signs, along with Gemini and Aquarius, as well as being one of the cardinal signs.   As such, its energy focuses on the outer world, rather than our inner world, and its main thrust is on social contact.  It seeks partnership – friendship, business, marriage.  It’s not about the passion of a personal relationship – Libra is not thought to be a passionate sign - but more about the ‘contract’, if you like – the need for equality and fairness within relationship.  Libra is the peacemaker, the negotiator, the mediator.  It’s ruled by Venus, providing a sense of refinement, and an awareness of beauty and harmony.

As usual, let’s start our exploration of Libra in the tarot with the Major Arcana.  In my previous post, I mentioned the idea of balance in various traditions – Egyptian and Greek mythology, Christianity – all of which use scales to symbolize the weighing up of whatever’s ‘in the balance’.  That, and the use of the blindfold in some of the imagery, leads us to the Justice card. 

Justice (trimmed):
© Sharman-Burke/Caselli Tarot
Depending on which deck you use, this is probably either the eighth or the eleventh card in the Major Arcana.  Most (but not all) Rider-Waite-Smith-based decks will have Justice as XI in the Major Arcana – the mid-point of the Fool’s Journey.  Personally, I like the idea of it being the 11th card; having it as the fulcrum of the journey, half-way between the start and the end ‘embodies’ that sense of balance.

Some RWS-based decks (for instance Juliet Sharman-Burke and Gionvanni Caselli’s, shown here) place Justice at VIII.   I haven’t found a clear reason for this in the case of the Sharman-Caselli deck, but my guess is that it’s because they wanted to have all four virtues appear in order: 8 – Justice, 9 – Temperance, 10 –Strength, and 11 - The Hermit, the card to which they attribute the virtue of Prudence.  Regardless of the card’s position in the Major Arcana, the image contains most of the ‘traditional’ (i.e. RWS-based) symbolism – the scales representing perfect balance in one hand, the sword of truth in the other.

Libra has a reputation (unfair, in my opinion!) for being indecisive. Following from Virgo’s need to analyze everything in great detail, Libra weighs it all carefully but is always having to take new factors into account, upsetting that delicate balance, hence appearing to be constantly changing its mind.  For this reason, my favourite version of the tarot card associated with Libra, Justice, comes from the Thoth deck (although Crowley has re-named the card ‘Adjustment’). 

Adjustment VIII (trimmed):
© Thoth Tarot
Like many versions of the Justice card, the image still shows a figure with a set of scales, although here the scales appear to be balanced on her head.  She holds the sword of truth in both hands, between her legs, while balancing on her toes. The entire image of one of balance and harmony – including the coloured spheres (blue for spirit and intellect, green for creativity) in their symmetrical placement. But how long can this balance be held?  All it takes is one distraction, one thought, one new factor, to be added to the scales, and the whole thing is no longer balanced.  So it’s not that Libra is indecisive per se – it’s more that that the picture isn’t static; there’s always something else that needs to be considered, something else to knock us off track. That’s why I like the name ‘Adjustment’ – we’re always having to make adjustments as new elements come into play, in order to maintain our (always precarious) balance!

As our ingress into Libra is also marked by the Autumn Equinox, let’s also look at cards that are associated with this festival.  One deck that uses the Wheel of the Year as its base, rather than astrological associations, is the Wildwood Tarot, created by Mark Ryan and John Matthews, and beautifully illustrated by Will Worthington.  Here we have two cards from the Major Arcana that sit at the Autumn Equinox – The Wheel (X) and The Mirror (XII). 
The Wheel (trimmed):
© Wildwood Tarot

The Wheel reminds us of the constantly changing seasons, and that what comes around, goes around.  The equinox is but a moment in time – one where the hours of day and night are balanced, before the hours of darkness increase at the expense of the light.  In many traditions, the autumnal equinox marks the start of a period of withdrawal - not just in terms of physical withdrawal or hibernation - but a time of introspection and inner journeying, contemplation and rest. 

The Mirror (trimmed):
© Wildwood Tarot
The Mirror shows us our reflection and allows us to see our inner selves, and by sitting on the Equinox represents the point at which our journey changes direction – from outer to inner; the point where we’re balanced between the two.  And although Mark Ryan and John Matthews aren’t making any astrological associations in their deck, the mirror is often used as to symbolize Libra. Both through Venus’ rulership and its affinity to the 7th house, Libra is concerned with attraction and partnership.  Aries, the sign opposite Libra in the zodiac, is about ‘I’: -how we meet the world as individuals, how we’re seen. Libra is concerned with ‘the other’ - what we look for in our relationships with others.  The mirror allows us to see what others see in us. ‘Mirror, mirror, on the wall, who is the fairest of them all?’ indeed!

If you’ve enjoyed this post, you might be interested in my new e-book, Astrology in Tarot, now available from Amazon.

Beginner’s Guide to the Tarot created by Juliet Sharman-Burke, illustrated by Giovanni Caselli, published by Connections
Thoth Tarot created by Aleister Crowley, illustrated by Lady Frieda Harris, published by US Games Systems, Inc.

Wildwood Tarot created by Mark Ryan and John Matthews, illustrated by Will Worthington, published by Connections.



Friday, 22 September 2017

Weighing it up - the Sun enters Libra

Today (22nd September) is – in the northern hemisphere – the Autumnal Equinox; in the southern hemisphere, the Vernal Equinox. It’s the turning point where, depending on which hemisphere you’re in, the days either become shorter (north) or longer (south), due to the tilt of the Earth and its position relative to the Sun.  This point, where the length of day apparently is equal to the length of night, is marked by the ingress of the Sun into the astrological sign of Libra (in the tropical zodiac) – the scales.

The constellation of Libra (Latin for “weighing scales”) was known as Zibanu (“balance” or “scales”) in Babylonian times. Scales were sacred to Shamash, the Babylonian sun god, who was also associated with truth and justice, concepts that are still associated with the sign of Libra today.  The Babylonians also called this constellation the Claws of the Scorpion – the constellation sits next to that of Scorpio and may have been considered to be part of the scorpion. The Arabic word for scorpion is “zubana”, not dissimilar to the Babylonians’ “zinbanu”, which might perhaps account for the “claws” becoming the ‘scales”.

In Egyptian mythology, Libra is represented by Ma’at, the goddess of the scales who would, at the time of death, weigh the human soul against an ostrich feather to determine whether or not the soul would reincarnate.  Greek mythology gives us Themis, a blindfolded seer who also carries a pair of scales.  The archangel Michael, in Christianity, holds the scales. In each tradition, the theme is balance, of keeping things – be they social or spiritual – in order.  But the story that resonates most with me is the Greek story of the Judgment of Paris.

It starts with the wedding of Peleus and Thetis. Eris, the goddess of Discord (a “shadow” side of Libra), hasn’t been invited but decides to gate-crash. She throws a golden apple down in front of all the goddesses who have been invited.  On the apple is inscribed ‘to the fairest’.... and so we have perhaps the first beauty pageant! Hera, Aphrodite and Athena are the front-runners, and ask Zeus to choose. Zeus, in his wisdom (or some would argue, cowardice!), elects Paris, a Trojan mortal to be the judge. Atop Mount Ida, the three goddesses attempted to bribe Paris – Hera dangled the prospect of becoming king of Europe and Asia, Athena wisdom and battle skills, and Aphrodite the most beautiful woman in the world.  Paris chose Aphrodite’s gift – Helen, wife of the Greek king Menelaus... and the rest, as they say, is history, at least in mythological terms.  The Trojan horse, the “face that launched a thousand ships” ... even the idea of “who is the fairest” comes up again and again – and not only in fairy tales such as Snow White!

‘Libra’ ©Alison Coals
So many Libran qualities are illustrated in this myth –beauty, harmony, attraction, negotiation and adjudication.  And no surprise that Venus (the Roman goddess most similar to Aphrodite) is the ruler of Libra!  But “to the fairest”?  That also taps into Libran ambiguity!  The fairest in terms of the most beautiful, or the most even-tempered? The most well-balanced when it comes to making judgments? Libra, despite the association with beauty and attraction through Venus, is more a sign of balance. It’s considered and reflective, more concerned with “the other” (7th house) than with the “I” (1st house). Libra is mediator, negotiator, and diplomat.

The image on the left comes from my AstroArt series - watercolour and ink collage.



Sunday, 17 September 2017

Virgo in the Minor Arcana: The Ten of Pentacles

Back to the Minor Arcana today, for a look at the last of the three Minor Arcana cards associated with Virgo.

Ten of Stones (trimmed):
© Wildwood Tarot
The Ten of Pentacles is linked to Mercury in Virgo (and to the final ten days of the sun’s journey through this sign: 13-22 September).  This is a particularly auspicious association, because Mercury not only rules Virgo, it’s also exalted in Virgo. What does that mean? Well, when a planet rules a sign, it’s at home.  It’s comfortable – it can kick off its shoes and put its feet up.  When it’s in exaltation, it’s also comfortable – but there’s a protocol to be observed.  A friend of mine uses this analogy: the Queen is at home in Sandringham or Buckingham Palace – she’s the ruler.  When she goes abroad, say to visit the White House, she knows she’ll be looked after, but there’s a certain formality and protocol that has to be followed – that’s exaltation.  Interesting that the Wildwood Tarot's Ten of Stones carries the title ‘Home’!

Ten of Pentacles (trimmed):
© Sharman-Burke/Caselli Tarot
But here, Mercury is both at home and exalted!  Remember what we said about Mercury, in the first of the Virgo posts? He’s the swift-footed messenger of the Roman gods, as is his Greek counterpart Hermes.  He’s also the god of trade (especially grains – a link to Virgo); the caduceus he carries being a symbol of trade and commerce.  It's also associated with medicine, although modern medical symbols appear to have lost one of the two twining serpents! Virgo is often associated with issues of health, through its ability to work with lots of information and finding a way to make them fit, e.g. holistic medicine.

So the Ten of Pentacles is a great card to have when it comes to acquiring wealth – whether it’s financial, physical (good health) or spiritual well-being.  Mercury in Virgo brings strong analytical skills to the table, and a clear, down-to-earth way of expressing ideas and putting them into some sort of order.  Virgo is practical and helpful – remember that link to the sixth house and the idea of ‘service’!  And it’s not just about acquiring wealth – it’s also necessary to share it ... and to enjoy it. 
Ten of Pentacles (trimmed):
© ShadowscapesTarot

In the Shadowscapes, the creators of the deck have chosen to depict the background landscape as a stained glass image. The art of staining glass seems to me very Virgo- in terms of the patience and dedication required in its creation - as well as reflecting the idea of the pattern that Virgo might seek in life.  I can see the coiling dragon as Mercury's caduceus, too.

Despite the double ‘whammy’ of rulership and exaltation, there’s another side to the coin.  Too much attention to detail can get in the way of seeing the bigger picture – that ‘not being able to see the wood for the trees’ thing.  Another potential ‘shadow side’ of the coin is fear of poverty. This can lead to holding on to things, rather than sharing.  Hoarded wealth stagnates: “the more you give, the more you receive”.

Beginner’s Guide to the Tarot created by Juliet Sharman-Burke, illustrated by Giovanni Caselli, published by Connections
Shadowscapes Tarot created by Stephanie Pui-Mun Law and Barbara Moore, published by Llewellyn
Wildwood Tarot created by Mark Ryan and John Matthews, illustrated by Will Worthington, published by Connections
If you’ve enjoyed this post, you might be interested in my new e-book, Astrology in Tarot, now available from Amazon.